This work was featured in multiple exhibitions domestic and abroad. It comments on one of mankind’s earliest technology: the written word. From the earliest handwritings to illuminated calligraphy and mechanically printed books, bibles were sacred objects and arguably is the most reproduced written text, each one handmade by scribes and binders of the highest caliber.

In the 21st century, handmade takes on new meaning amid the century of information and technology. Bookbinding, calligraphy, and illumination—skills that were essential to the continuation and education of humanity—are now rendered on screens. Artists are becoming authors of code, and consequently, we experience fewer binders of codices or writers of calligraphy. This work questions the position of technology and its ability (or inability) to preserve written texts. It also brings the dichotomy between mechanically-made and hand-made closer into dialogue for analysis.

10,000 Bibles is made from 5 used iPhones (pre-2012) of interchanging black and white colors, bound by weaving a gold threaded wire from an I-beam glued to the phone, through the leather spine, then back around the phone’s I-beam. The leather cover is illuminated by hand using metallic calligraphy ink and a fine brush and coated with a semi-gloss varnish to preserve the exterior.







Inspiration

10,000 Bibles was heavily inspired by my travels abroad to Italy. More specifically, the initial spark for this book arose while I was at the 57 International Biennale Arte, VIVA ARTE VIVA, in Venice, Italy. These two works (see scroller below) by Japanese artist Shimabuku hugely impacted me. The juxtaposition was so simple, and beautiful. I wanted to achieve something equivalent but between books and digital screens.

Shimabuku, The Oldest and Newest Tools of Human Beings Shimabuku, The Oldest and Newest Tools of Human Beings Shimabuku, Sharpening a MacBook Air Shimabuku, Sharpening a MacBook Air Shimabuku, Sharpening a MacBook Air

Sources